Yehoodi.com

Frim Fram Jam, NY     Yehoodi Radio - Listen 24 hours a day! Listen 24 hours a day! Weekly updated shows     Frim Fram Jam - NYC's Lindy Hop Thursdays!    

What are you reading?

  • Joined 1/16/01
  • 12597

Chilling the debate for a second, I thought it would be fun to just talk about books.

My high school Senior English teacher, the late Mrs. Theibert, insisted that we should read three books at a time - a play in class, a book on our own to be discussed in class, and a third book of our choosing for fun. Mrs. Theibert was the most well-read person I ever knew.

Since her passing I have tried my hardest to live up to that. I find that two at a time is the most I can really handle, but I can deal with three if the third is semi-fun/easy (like plays tend to be).

Right now I'm 600 pages into Neal Stephenson's "Quicksilver." It's a bit dense and difficult at times, sometimes you have to really slog through it, but it's fantastic stuff. I can't wait to see what kind of ending he has in store. He always had great endings. I think though that there are two more 900 page books before I even get there.

I've also just started reading Robert Boston's fantastic book, "Why the Religious Right is Wrong about Separation of Church and State." It's a really illuminating history book that analyzes the history of church/state separation in America, but at the same time does not devalue the importance of religion in people's lives. What the Religious Right is wrong about is that separation of church and state actually HELPS religion. The US is one of the most religious countries in the world, and the author argues that is is BECAUSE of church/state separation. Interesting stuff.

What are you all reading?

Yehoodi Featured Topics

Related Topics

 

Page(s): 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 25 26 Next > (764 items total, 30 per page)

 
  • Joined 4/8/01
  • 1185
  • Post #1
  • Originally posted Sunday, February 8, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

Marcelo, I like the three-book-at-a-time theory... I am in the middle of three books right now myself, just coincidentally. I find I often do this, though, because there is often more than one book that I am dying to read!! And, with my busy life, it tends to take me longer than I wish it might to finish just one.

Right now, I am reading: The Orchid Thief by Susan Orlean The Death and Life of Great American Cities by Jane Jacobs and The Best American Travel Writing of 2002

Next on my list: 20th Century History of Argentina Among the Thugs by Bill Buford

The Orchid Thief is a fun read and explains much of that "Florida weirdness" so often discussed on Yehoodi :wink: ...... Orlean is great at the detailed exploration of an eccentric character, and at creating a sense of place. It's fun to learn about the orchid collectors of years gone by too... The orchid trade was huge in England, and men risked their lives to bring back ever-more-exotic varieties of these elusive beauties.

The Jacobs book I am finally reading after having a half-dozen different people recommend it to me. It has been on my list for a while, and was worth the wait. It is an engaging and thought-provoking commentary on the complex machinations and the real beauty of big cities, which are have an ecosystem of their own, according to Jacobs (I agree). She also rails against the evils of much current city planning. The book was written in the 1960s but is still relevant today.

Finally, I am reading the Best American Travel Writing, which rocks, by the way, to help inspire me as I complete my travel journals from my trip to Argentina. I kept a daily log there, and am turning it into an essay now about my trip. This book has many wonderful examples of fun, fluid, educational and/or exotic travel stories.

I loooove books!!!! (My TV has been unplugged, sitting in the living room, for weeks, and I don't miss it one bit).

  • Joined 9/19/00
  • 1085
  • Post #2
  • Originally posted Sunday, February 8, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

Soros: The Life and Times of a Messianic Billionaire Talks about his works with Open Society. How he made his money in Quantum funds. How he helped Eastern Europe's transformation from a closed society to an open one and saved it from imploding during the crucial years of glastnost and perestroika.

John LeCarre's "Absolute Friends" Always been a fan of LeCarre since "The Little Drummer Girl". His work is almost as important to me as Leon Uris. His subjects mingling within the context of greater soceital upheavals, from the cold war thru the fundamenalist ressurection. Thick in description, pregnant of philosophical ideas and practical motivations. This book carried me from Lahore, to Oxford to the Berlin Wall all the way to Heidelberg. Facsinating character developments. Could be dull at times. But overall entertaining.

Anarchism: Demanding the Impossible by Peter Marshall. An introduction for me to the most misunderstood political thought of our time. This is anarchism 101. It talks about all the movements and how Anarchism is all over us without knowing. Even Jesus was mentioned as an antiauthoritarian rebel. Could not finish the book. Like the nglish Patient's book History of Herodotus, I carried it around, rereading it constantly, from the beaches of Malmok, to the trains of Chiba, to the cafes beside Prinsengraacht. It has been a good companion, constantly nagging me, questioning my ideals and mores, stretching my patience and humiliating my understanding of what is it really all about.

mee mee
  • Joined 9/17/02
  • 55
  • Post #3
  • Originally posted Sunday, February 8, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)
Quoted from "REDHOTnBLUE"
The Jacobs book I am finally reading after having a half-dozen different people recommend it to me. It has been on my list for a while, and was worth the wait. It is an engaging and thought-provoking commentary on the complex machinations and the real beauty of big cities, which are have an ecosystem of their own, according to Jacobs (I agree). She also rails against the evils of much current city planning. The book was written in the 1960s but is still relevant today.

totally agree. i read this for my urban econ course and it was phenominal. jacobs also wrote "the economy of citie".... not quite as good, but still very thought-provoking.

  • Joined 7/20/03
  • 4033
  • Post #4
  • Originally posted Sunday, February 8, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

I usually read just two at a time--one fiction and one non-fiction. I was about 1/4 of the way through a 1000-page biography, "Churchill," when I had to pack it up for Iraq. I recently completed "Wild at Heart," a book about why it is good that men have violent instincts and "Dereliction of Duty," a book by a lt. colonel who served literally at Clinton's side about how President Clinton endangered national security and let Osama get away because he was too busy watching a golf tournament to be bothered with news that we had planes in the air reading to bomb Osama if he gave the word. In fiction, I recently finished John Grisham's "The Street Lawyer."

  • Joined 11/1/03
  • 123
  • Post #5
  • Originally posted Sunday, February 8, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

3 books at a time is excessive for my reading habits and I usually restrict myself to two, usually a fiction and a non-fiction book. Right now, I'm reading Bruce Sterling's "Islands in the Net" because I've been informed that my status as a proper nerd is in serious question until I've read all of his books.

I'm also working my way through "The Cathedral and the Bazzarre" by Eric Raymond.

So yeah, retro nerdish theme for me this month.

MrG MrG
  • Joined 5/30/01
  • 281
  • Post #6
  • Originally posted Sunday, February 8, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

I used to be able to only do one at a time...but recently I have moved up.

I read Animal Farm in a sitting the other day. I'm currently getting through "The Art of War" and "Me Talk Pretty One Day".

  • Joined 8/25/02
  • 270
  • Post #7
  • Originally posted Sunday, February 8, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)
Quoted from "Marcelo"
) I've also just started reading Robert Boston's fantastic book, "Why the Religious Right is Wrong about Separation of Church and State." It's a really illuminating history book that analyzes the history of church/state separation in America, but at the same time does not devalue the importance of religion in people's lives. What the Religious Right is wrong about is that separation of church and state actually HELPS religion. The US is one of the most religious countries in the world, and the author argues that is is BECAUSE of church/state separation. Interesting stuff. What are you all reading?

The big bounce (which is hard to get through - but I LOVE elmore leonard. i think i'm just biding my time until the new one hits the shelves...)

and When We Were Saints by...Han Nolan - it's about a 14 year old boy finding God. it's interesting so far.

and i just finished Kenneth Cole's Footnotes. it was really good. i love his company. i love their philosophy. i love their clothes. i love the way he writes. yup.

  • Joined 7/10/01
  • 282
  • Post #8
  • Originally posted Sunday, February 8, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

today i'm in the midst of reading Caleb Williams by William Godwin (1794). i don't recommend it unless you're into 18th c. fiction.

HOWEVER, yesterday i read Zakes Mba's Ways of Dying. very good book. the main character is a self-taught professional mourner, and it's set in the "temporary settlements" of south africa. very funny. very horrible.

last week i read Monica Ali's Brick Lane. also really, really good. story of a bangladeshi woman living in london. also funny.

  • Joined 4/23/01
  • 779
  • Post #9
  • Originally posted Sunday, February 8, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

I'm reading 1929 by Frederick Turner(copyright 2003). Turner offers a fictional take on the life of Bix Beiderbeck. The book covers what life was like for musicians leading up to the Great Depression. Highlights include Prohibition and life on the streets of Al Capone's Chicago.This book is Turner's tribute to a Jazz Age icon. :D

  • Joined 4/6/99
  • 1571
  • Post #10
  • Originally posted Sunday, February 8, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

How did you know I was reading 3 books?

Save Karyn, One Shopaholics Guide to Debt and Back- Karen Bosnak So engrossing, I missed my stop on the subway.

Stitch 'n Bitch, the Knitters Handbook- Debbie Stoler Another hobby?

One Life is not Enough- Zsa Zsa Gabor So provocative someone tried to pick me up on the subway, I'll save this book for bed!

  • Joined 1/16/01
  • 12597
  • Post #11
  • Originally posted Sunday, February 8, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

I have Stitch and Bitch. It's a great reference.

  • Joined 4/14/00
  • 315
  • Post #12
  • Originally posted Sunday, February 8, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

Just read "Ender's Game" and "Ender's Shadow" by Orson Scott Card. Sci-Fi books about genius kids and the fight to save the world. Highly recommended.

Am reading "Cosmos" by the late Carl Sagan.

Next up is "'Tis" by Frank McCourt, which is a follow-up on Angela's Ashes.

"Our imagination is stretched to the utmost, not, as in fiction, to imagine things which are not really there, but just to comprehend those things which 'are' there." - Richard Feynman

  • Joined 8/28/01
  • 1584
  • Post #13
  • Originally posted Sunday, February 8, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

Finished reading Legacy by Rich Lowry. Followed it with An End To Evil by Richard Perle and David Frum. Both were excellent, worthwhile reads. Looking to start anoth but haven't decided. Haven't read any Victor Davis Hanson and probably should start with Mexicanfornia or An Autumn of War.

"I would like to take you seriously, but to do so would affront your intelligence." --William F. Buckley Jr.

  • Joined 12/31/69
  • 2788
  • Post #14
  • Originally posted Sunday, February 8, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

About half way through "Clash of Civilizations", by Huntington. Also pretty dense. I'm reading it slowly and underlining. Amazing how much he got right (and wrong) about what is happening right now even though it was written in 93. Warning: this is not a feel-good book.

When I can get to it, Theodore White's "In Search of History". He was a journalist who covered China for Time Magazine during the days leading up to the end of WWII. He talked at length with many a Nationalist leader as well as Communist leader, and interviewed Mao many times as well. At this point he is in Paris during the Marshall Plan. I'll let you know if the Europeans are grateful or not...

  • Joined 12/31/69
  • 1272
  • Post #15
  • Originally posted Sunday, February 8, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

I am presently slogging through "Morals and Dogma" by Col. Albert Pike. This much maligned book is very dry, but also very enlightening...IF one takes the time to read, re-read, and ponder.

I say much maligned because conspiracy theorists tend quote and misquote it entirely out of context...and without ever having read it!

Carry on...

  • Joined 4/25/02
  • 122
  • Post #16
  • Originally posted Monday, February 9, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

Just finished reading Atlas Shrugged - Fantastic book! My new favorite. I love Ayn Rand!

Currently reading: The Da Vinci Code - Not too thrilled about it so far. It reads like a movie. Lots of mystery, action and facts, but not a lot of character depth.

Catcher in the Rye - Read it about 5 years ago and loved it. I just thought I'd pick it up again because it fits so nicely into my coat pocket :)

Mere Christianity - Started reading it after Atlas Shrugged, but it felt like it was too conflicting with the philosophy of Ayn Rand, so I coudn't get into it. Guess I have to clean my palett with another book and come back to this one.

  • Joined 1/20/99
  • 14702
  • Post #17
  • Originally posted Monday, February 9, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

Just finished Big Bad Brawley Brown, by Walter Mosely. Awesome mystery novel set in 1960s LA.

In the middle of Wang II, a French dystopic sci-fi novel, where rich Northern countries wage staged "wars" from history using Third World slaves. Wang is a chinese inscripted slave-soldier who bucks the system. Nice mix of action and political intrigue.

Marcelo, I have read and loved everything the Neal Stephenson has done, butt I'm a little afraid of his new series. It makes Chryptonomichron seem light be comparison.

  • Joined 1/16/01
  • 12597
  • Post #18
  • Originally posted Monday, February 9, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

Rik, it's not too bad. If you were able to get through "Cryptonomicon", you should be okay. Yes, this whole "Baroque Cycle" is the biggest densest thing Stephenson has ever written (and you know that that's saying a lot), but it's quite good. Although I think when I finish I'm going to go back and have a second look at Crypto...just to be sure I know what I'm reading. "Quicksilver" is sort of a...companion piece. There are concurrent themes, bloodlines, and even a character that's in both (hard to explain). It's been like 2 years since I read Crypto, and the thought of re-reading all 1200 pages of it as a refresher is a little unnerving.

So far nothing I've read equals the absolute mastery in "The Diamond Age," but it's still definitely really appealing, and Stephenson, as you know, tends to save his best material for his denouements. But yeah. Diamond Age. That's one of the best books I've ever read.

I just finished the Robert Boston book about Separation of Church and State. The historical documentation is awesome, and leaves no doubt in my mind of the Framer's intent towards this issue. I thought the militant call-to-arms at the end of the book (against fundamentalist Reconstructionists like Pat Robertson and Jerry Falwell), while appropriate and worthy of consideration, was a bit much. A very good read for anyone who wants to know why the US is specifically NOT a Christian Nation, and why religious people who argue against separation are actually doing themselves a disservice.

  • Joined 2/5/99
  • 549
  • Post #19
  • Originally posted Monday, February 9, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

Cats of Any Color - Lees - about racism and how it affected jazz history and our perception of jazz history, written by an editor of Downbeat magazine.

We wish to inform you that tomorrow we will be killed with our faimiles: Stories from Rwanda - Philip Gourevitch - Powerful, chilling book about the 1994 genocide.

Berlin Stories - Christopher Isherwood - the stories that inspired the musical, Caberet.

  • Joined 7/17/99
  • 966
  • Post #20
  • Originally posted Monday, February 9, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

Just finished The Da Vinci Code (didn't read....listened on CD). I agree with Nick. Decent read, but will make a much better movie. And I figured out a few of the codes waaaaaaay before the characters did which made me sit there and think, "what are you, stupid?"

Also just finished Bleachers, Grisham's latest attempt at a heartfelt novel about high school football in Texas. It was pretty good, if a bit sappy. Friday Night Lights is a much better book on the subject if you're looking.

Now I am in the middle of Grisham's new thriller The Last Juror which so far (about 1/2 way through) seems back to true Grisham form--which for me means not incredibly intellectual, but a fun book to read. I have been disappointed with his last few books, so I was a bit wary of this one, but so far it is excellent.

Also reading Shut Out: A Story of Race and Baseball in Boston. This is a bit dry so far, but very informative. I need to force myself to get more into it because it has received great reviews. I think I just haven't delved deep enough yet.

An who could forget that classic Actuarial Mathematics? Ah....studying is fun.

  • Joined 12/15/00
  • 196
  • Post #21
  • Originally posted Monday, February 9, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

I tend to read many books at once.

Reading Le Carre's Russia House and Le Comte de Monte Cristo d'Alexandre Dumas, vol II... for circumstantial reasons when I finished vol I a while back I ended up stuck on other books and never went on to finish it until now. I've also picked up Covey's Seven Habits which is interesting.

Just finished John Ralston Saul, On Equilibrium, which I found to be a very interesting book and worthy conclusion to what apparently (retronymically?) is his philosophical trilogy--the others being Voltaire's Bastards: The Dictatorship of Reason in the West, and The Unconscious Civilization. The theme of the trilogy is that "reason" has gotten out of control in Western society and undermines the other equally important human intellectual qualities (ethics, imagination, memory, etc.). Overall a VERY good trilogy but Bastards is very dense (especially if you consider Cryptonomicon to be dense) since he crams in copious references to prove his point. By On Equilibrium it's more about ideas than references so it's a bit of a lighter read. Good stuff, though.

An another note Stephenson is one of my favourite authors--long as it may be I've re-read Cryptonomicon many times. I hesitated for a long time before reading Snow Crash because of all the people that had recommended it (oh, must be bland and shallow if everyone likes it... oops). Also read Diamond Age, Zodiac. Great meal for the mind.

  • Joined 9/2/99
  • 3132
  • Post #22
  • Originally posted Monday, February 9, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)
Quoted from "Karmic Swing"
3 books at a time is excessive for my reading habits and I usually restrict myself to two, usually a fiction and a non-fiction book. Right now, I'm reading Bruce Sterling's "Islands in the Net" because I've been informed that my status as a proper nerd is in serious question until I've read all of his books.

Dude, skip the Sterling, Neal Stephenson is where its at for the real geeks. :wink:

The going rumor was that his book Snow Crash was "required reading" for Microsoft employment. All kidding aside, I think Stephenson is a much better writer too. For Cyberpunk you can't go wrong with early William Gibson Nueromancer, Count Zero, Mona Lisa Overdrive, and Burning Chrome. But for pure current-fad geekness Stephenson's Snow Crash, A Diamond Age, Cryptonomicon, and Quicksilver are 4 of the best fiction books I've read in the last year or so.

  • Joined 5/16/03
  • 108
  • Post #23
  • Originally posted Monday, February 9, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

I also read 2 - 3 books at a time. Currently working on:

West of Rome - John Fante (re-read) The Idiot - Dostoyevsky A History of Terror, Fear & Dread Through The Ages - Paul Newman

  • Joined 12/8/00
  • 2196
  • Post #24
  • Originally posted Monday, February 9, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)
Quoted from "Just Jesse"
When I can get to it, Theodore White's "In Search of History". He was a journalist who covered China for Time Magazine during the days leading up to the end of WWII. He talked at length with many a Nationalist leader as well as Communist leader, and interviewed Mao many times as well. At this point he is in Paris during the Marshall Plan. I'll let you know if the Europeans are grateful or not...

Jesse, this sounds like an awesome book. I'll have to check it out some time. After taking a class on chinese history last semester, I've since been fairly intrigued with the Cultural Revolution and Mao and the Kuomitang and that whole crazy time. A nice follow up for you might be Wild Swans. I can't remember the author's name, but it's about three generations of women from the late Qing dynasty up until the seventies. It's both a great read and extremely informative in terms of the lead up to and the postlude of the cultural revolution.

Because I'm still working in school my reading habits have dropped off for the most part. But I'm starting Upton Sinclair's The Jungle. I finished recently The Orchid Thief by Susan Orlean which after having traveled to Florida in the last month was an interesting comparison. I finished another book in the last month but I've totally forgotten what it was.

  • Joined 9/2/99
  • 3132
  • Post #25
  • Originally posted Monday, February 9, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)
Quoted from "Slick Rik"
Marcelo, I have read and loved everything the Neal Stephenson has done, butt I'm a little afraid of his new series. It makes Chryptonomichron seem light be comparison.

Actually, having read both, I think Quicksilver is a better read, and much easier to keep track of than Cryptonomincon. Diamond Age is a favorite, but man, you just have to love the Shaftoes. Quicksilver trumps A Diamond Age for me.

As for what I am reading now:

The Modern Prince: What Leaders Need to Know by Carnes Lord. It's a modern take on Machiavelli. I just started it so I'm still feeling it out. Lord is definitely a conservative, but he seems to be willing to spread his criticism and critique to everyone.

Soul of a Citizen: Living With Conviction in a Cynical Time by Paul Rogat Loeb. Basically it is a book about getting involved in community, politics, activism etc. Definitely a liberal perspective, but the ideas presented about the act of becomeing involved and why people do and do not do it can apply to either side.

I'm not currently reading any fiction, but I recently finished The Telling by Ursula K. LeGuin. I'm kind of stuck in the middle of Solaris by Stanislaw Lem too.

If you just want some really fun SciFi, pick up A Fire Upon The Deep and A Deepness In the Sky by Vernor Vinge, really great high Scifi/Space Opera. Trust me, ignore the cover and the title and read. Vinge may be the best creator/writer of aliens that I have come across plus he's an anarchist in the grand, developed, political sense, so you get an interesting overall theme as well.

  • Joined 11/15/01
  • 3062
  • Post #26
  • Originally posted Monday, February 9, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

Been slacking off on my reading since before the beginning of the year. Just got too busy with SoFlex and other stuff. ;)

Currently re-reading Belinda by Anne Rice (written as Anne Rampling). One of my faves... I like re-reading stuff because it's like having a conversation with an old friend you haven't seen in a while.

I saw the movie "Adaptation" last night with a friend, so now I want to read The Orchid Thief by Orlean. Seems very interesting. :)

I have no problems reading 3 books at a time, but if I were to acquire a new "reading goal" it would be to read more non-fiction. I equate non-fiction with high school reading lists and such, and therefore it seems like a chore when it really shouldn't be.

Tina 8)

bluesSHOUT! 2010 is coming to Austin! http://www.bluesshout.com Favorite Tim Tebow-ism: Jesus opens presents on Tim Tebow's birthday. :)

  • Joined 1/23/03
  • 97
  • Post #27
  • Originally posted Monday, February 9, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

I'm rereading the LOTR trilogy just because I do that every so often (yes, the rumors are true... I'm a nerd!)

Also, I'm reading Shogun by James Clavell. I'm not normally a big fan of history, but this book is excellent! I'm hooked and I'm planning on going through the entire series now.

Other than that, I don't have a lot of time to read 3-4 books at a time for pleasure because my poor eyes have to take a break from studying for school! :-P

I am intrigued by The Orchid Thief as well because I thought "Adaptation" was a cool movie, too! But I'll probably start on The Tao of Pooh, before that one. Any other suggestions??

  • Joined 2/7/01
  • 13635
  • Post #28
  • Originally posted Monday, February 9, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

I just finished American Scream: The Bill Hicks Story the autobiography of comedian Bill Hicks, who was on his way to becoming one of the most important voices in American comedy when he died of cancer in 1994. While the book doesn't go into much psychological depth as to what drove his anger and comedy, it does give a good over view of his life.

Right now I'm skimming portions of Bob Zmuda's Andy Kaufman biography for background info for a review of their unproduced movie script The Tony Clifton Story I'm writing for my website.

The velocity of Spanish is that many tables do not have sadness...

  • Joined 4/24/02
  • 84
  • Post #29
  • Originally posted Monday, February 9, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

Current reading list... hehe...

My personal light reading: The Monk and The Philosopher; a dialogue between Jean-Francois Revel & Matthieu Ricard, father and son respectively. Very interesting book between a father who is a relatively classic philosopher and a son who became a buddhist monk after being in biology till after completing his PhD.

Rorty & his Critics; a collection of articles and responses between Richard Rorty and various other folk. I heart Rorty.

The New Social Face of Buddhism: A Call to Action; Ken Jones... another one on hold for now, but I'm almost done it. It's an interesting read on how Buddhists get involved in social action in the world and good if you want to look at contemporary buddhism in action. I note it's focused on Zen practices mostly.

The Art of Happiness; H.H. the Dalai Lama, this is on hold for now but quite enjoyable.

For classes:

The Inclusion of the Other; Jurgen Habermas

Political Liberalism; John Rawls

Time & Narrativity: Vol III; Paul Ricouer... so far good, the discussion revolving around this book in class is excellent so far

Epistemology; Laurence BonJour, an intro book into Epist... it's for a required Into class otherwise I'd have forgone it for a more solid epistemology class.

Contemporary Political Philosophy; Will Kymlicka - a book which goes over a broad range of areas of political philosophy

Continental Philosophy: An Anthology; edited by McNeill, a bunch of philosophers but it's annoying because you only get pieces of works.

and two course packs, one regarding Rawls & Habermas and the other on the broad spectrum of political philosophy.

I am usually in the middle of reading like 5 books at once since I get probably 3 to 5 hundred pages of reading a week for classes.

If I had more time, I got a chapter into a history of vernacular jazz dance (think that's the title) while I was in Amsterdam, my host had it, and want to go back and finish reading it. Looks quite interesting. Also need to finish Idoru which I started like a year ago and put down when I went back to classes in the fall.

  • Joined 6/13/01
  • 1141
  • Post #30
  • Originally posted Monday, February 9, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

i just finished One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Marquez and that is currently lent out to a friend of mine.

i will now probably start Case for Faith. or i'll re read the chronicles of Narnia series. i haven't decided.

Page(s): 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 25 26 Next > (764 items total, 30 per page)