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  What are you reading?

  • Posted Over 10 years ago
  • by Marcelo

Chilling the debate for a second, I thought it would be fun to just talk about books. My high school Senior English teacher, the late Mrs. Theibert, insisted that we should read three books at a time - a play in class, a book on our own to be discussed in class, and a third book of our…

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  • Joined 4/22/05
  • 220
  • Post #511
  • Originally posted Sunday, February 24, 2008 (6 years ago)

Sex, Drugs and Cocoa Puffs by Chuck Klosterman

  • Joined 8/2/02
  • 6448
  • Post #512
  • Originally posted Friday, February 29, 2008 (6 years ago)

Alice Cooper's new book.. "Golf Monster"... What a really great book! He talks all about his drug and alcohol addictions, and how his "Twelve steps of Golf" saved his life. He also talks about Frank Zappa, Rod Steward, Mick Jagger, and other rockers who had positive and negative effects on his life.

I have a really hard time putting it down. Alice lives in NYC too! This is a guy I would really like to talk to for hours. For his sake, I hope he never runs into me at Balthazar or Jezebels. :P

  • Joined 10/28/00
  • 1706
  • Post #513
  • Originally posted Saturday, March 1, 2008 (6 years ago)

I'm reading a bunch of ranting in the form of yehoodi posts.

  • Joined 4/6/99
  • 1571
  • Post #514
  • Originally posted Saturday, March 1, 2008 (6 years ago)

I just finished Love Over Scotland by Alexander McCall Smith. The next book in the series is from Berties point of view, I can't wait.

I will start More Tales of the City by Armistead Maupin. Hope it is as trashy as part 1.

  • Joined 1/16/01
  • 12597
  • Post #515
  • Originally posted Saturday, March 1, 2008 (6 years ago)

I'm now reading Haruki Murakami's Hard-Boiled Wonderland and The End of the World, which is following my reading of The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, which is one of the best books I've ever read in my life.

  • Joined 4/23/01
  • 779
  • Post #516
  • Originally posted Tuesday, March 4, 2008 (6 years ago)

SEX THE FACTS THE ACTS &amp; YOUR FEELINGS (1981)

By Dr. Michael Carrera

Back in the day when I majoring in Community Health Education at Hunter College:The School Of Health Sciences this book was required reading! Dr. Carrera is an impressive educator! This is a great book. Read It.

www.ovguide.com www.tropicalglen.com www.free-tv-video-online.info

  • Joined 4/23/01
  • 779
  • Post #517
  • Originally posted Thursday, March 6, 2008 (6 years ago)

Nothing's Sacred (2005) By Lewis Black

Den Of Thieves (1991) By James B. Stewart

www.ovguide.com www.tropicalglen.com www.free-tv-video-online.info

  • Joined 8/28/01
  • 1584
  • Post #518
  • Originally posted Thursday, March 27, 2008 (6 years ago)
Quoted from "Carlita"
Sex, Drugs and Cocoa Puffs by Chuck Klosterman

Frickin' phenomenal book, Carlita. I read it years ago when it came out and let me say, Chuck Klosterman (who at one time wrote for my local rag, the Akron Beacon Journal) really surprised me as a witty social commentator of pop culture.

"I would like to take you seriously, but to do so would affront your intelligence." --William F. Buckley Jr.

  • Joined 8/28/01
  • 1584
  • Post #519
  • Originally posted Thursday, March 27, 2008 (6 years ago)

Just downloaded the audio version of A Bound Man: Why We Are Excited About Barack Obama and Why He Can't Win by Shelby Steele.

"I would like to take you seriously, but to do so would affront your intelligence." --William F. Buckley Jr.

  • Joined 4/22/05
  • 220
  • Post #520
  • Originally posted Thursday, March 27, 2008 (6 years ago)

If you like Chuck Klosterman, you might like the book I'm reading now called Smile When You're Lying: Confessions of a Rogue Travel Writer. I'm about 10 pages away from being done, and I don't want it to end!

  • Joined 4/23/01
  • 779
  • Post #521
  • Originally posted Thursday, March 27, 2008 (6 years ago)

Buying Stocks Without A Broker (1996) By Charles B. Carlson, CFA

www.ovguide.com www.tropicalglen.com www.free-tv-video-online.info

  • Joined 4/6/99
  • 1571
  • Post #522
  • Originally posted Thursday, March 27, 2008 (6 years ago)

I have been reading Tales of the city by Armisted Maupin, I'll start the 4th book soon. CBS Sunday Morning did a story about the books, since the author released a new book to the 40 year old series.

I love any book that is originally published as a serialized novel like Tales of the city or 44 Scotland Street by A. McCall Smith. Why? Because I do most of my reading on a subway and short chapters are appreciated.

  • Joined 8/28/00
  • 10530
  • Post #523
  • Originally posted Friday, March 28, 2008 (6 years ago)
Quoted from "DCjumper"
Just downloaded the audio version of A Bound Man: Why We Are Excited About Barack Obama and Why He Can't Win by Shelby Steele.

Just curious, does "can't win" in this context mean "is not capable of winning", or "must be stopped"? Not looking to start a whole discussion about it (we have enough threads for that), but I can see it being used both ways.

Martinis do not contain vodka. —Rachel Maddow

  • Joined 2/29/08
  • 1121
  • Post #524
  • Originally posted Friday, March 28, 2008 (6 years ago)

Naked by David Sedaris Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein Awakening the Buddha Within by Lama Surya Das

  • Joined 5/18/04
  • 6808
  • Post #525
  • Originally posted Saturday, March 29, 2008 (6 years ago)

"Change your thoughts, and you change your world" - Norman Vincent Peale.

  • Joined 12/8/02
  • 1110
  • Post #526
  • Originally posted Friday, May 16, 2008 (6 years ago)

I just finished "Template", by Matt Hughes, which I received in electronic form with a promise to post about it. Yes, I whored myself out for a free novel. Hughes comes well recommended, and I quite enjoyed a snippet of another book he's had published.

Template is a science-fiction novel about a man named Conn Labro. It is set at some undetermined point in the far future. Labro is an indentured servant at a large gaming facility, having been raised from infancy to be the house's representative in games that gamblers play against the house. These contests seem to take many forms, but are quite often duels. Labro is exceptional at what he does, ranked among the highest on Thrais, the world the novel starts on.

Labro's life is thrown into disorder when his mentor is killed and the gambling house destroyed. His mentor leaves him enough money to buy his way out of servitude, and a strange object, an encrypted bearer deed. Labro sets off for Old Earth to discover the meaning of the bearer deed, bring his mentor's murderers to justice, and discover his place in the universe. Along the way, Hughes paints interesting little vignettes of the cultures of the worlds within the Spray, the collection of planets that humans have settled.

I have to say that the book is a mixed bag. The plot was quite interesting, with very satisfying and unexpected ending. The characterization was quite good for some characters (the main character, especially), but I found both the characterization and the dialog too often lacking.

Dave

  • Joined 12/8/04
  • 2429
  • Post #527
  • Originally posted Friday, May 16, 2008 (6 years ago)

I just finished reading Motherless Brooklyn - which I had no interest in reading until I salvaged it (along with 5 other books) from the dumpster when my boss cleaned out her office.

Anyway, I got sucked in right away, which suprized me. I think it was the righting style that got me - and the fact that I couldn't figure out who done it. A bit to contrived on the reveal - it started out being done uniquely and then fell into a trap of sounding just like any other mystery. The actual ending, post reveal I found to be flat too. Kind of a "oh crap, I made the reveal, how to I tie it all up?"

I'm no on to another attempt at Don Quioxte (taking forever as I have an incorrectly bound copy - 8 chapters were inserted upside down and backwards. Aggrivating!) and just purchases The Bhagavad Gita which has been on my list for quite some time.

  • Joined 1/16/06
  • 1542
  • Post #528
  • Originally posted Friday, May 16, 2008 (6 years ago)

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon.

Ostensibly it's a mystery about a dog that's been killed, written in the first person by an autistic savant. At a deeper level it's a window into the mind of an autistic teenager written by someone who has worked with autistic children for several years. I finished it a couple of days ago and gave it to my 12-year-old daughter. She's reading it now and says it's excellent.

  • Joined 7/6/00
  • 3554
  • Post #529
  • Originally posted Friday, May 16, 2008 (6 years ago)

The Threat: Revealing the Secret Alien Agenda by David M. Jacobs

  • Joined 5/28/06
  • 613
  • Post #530
  • Originally posted Friday, May 16, 2008 (6 years ago)

Deal Souls, Nikolai Gogol

My early jazz blog: www.avalonjazz.blogspot.com

  • Joined 5/6/01
  • 3044
  • Post #531
  • Originally posted Friday, May 16, 2008 (6 years ago)

On Beauty by Zadie Smith. Top 10 by Alan Moore

  • Joined 12/8/04
  • 2429
  • Post #532
  • Originally posted Friday, May 16, 2008 (6 years ago)
Quoted from "lilieblue"
On Beauty by Zadie Smith.

How are you liking that? It's on my list.

  • Joined 11/20/00
  • 16167
  • Post #533
  • Originally posted Friday, May 16, 2008 (6 years ago)
Quoted from "David_D"
I just finished "Template", by Matt Hughes, which I received in electronic form with a promise to post about it. Yes, I whored myself out for a free novel. Hughes comes well recommended, and I quite enjoyed a snippet of another book he's had published. Template is a science-fiction novel about a man named Conn Labro. It is set at some undetermined point in the far future. Labro is an indentured servant at a large gaming facility, having been raised from infancy to be the house's representative in games that gamblers play against the house. These contests seem to take many forms, but are quite often duels. Labro is exceptional at what he does, ranked among the highest on Thrais, the world the novel starts on. Labro's life is thrown into disorder when his mentor is killed and the gambling house destroyed. His mentor leaves him enough money to buy his way out of servitude, and a strange object, an encrypted bearer deed. Labro sets off for Old Earth to discover the meaning of the bearer deed, bring his mentor's murderers to justice, and discover his place in the universe. Along the way, Hughes paints interesting little vignettes of the cultures of the worlds within the Spray, the collection of planets that humans have settled. I have to say that the book is a mixed bag. The plot was quite interesting, with very satisfying and unexpected ending. The characterization was quite good for some characters (the main character, especially), but I found both the characterization and the dialog too often lacking. Dave

This sounds right up my alley. Is it only available in electronic form? (I'm willing to pay for a copy; no whoring for me.)

  • Joined 12/8/02
  • 1110
  • Post #534
  • Originally posted Friday, May 16, 2008 (6 years ago)
Quoted from "RubyMae"
Quoted from "David_D"
I just finished "Template", by Matt Hughes, which I received in electronic form with a promise to post about it. Yes, I whored myself out for a free novel.
This sounds right up my alley. Is it only available in electronic form? (I'm willing to pay for a copy; no whoring for me.)

I believe it's available from here (I'm not sure if this is pre-order or not): http://store.pspublishing.co.uk/acatalog/template_hc.html I emailed the author to find out if there are any other (more US friendly) ways to get it.

Hughes has a website ( http://www.archonate.com/ ) which has more information about his books, often with the initial chapter available to read online. Some of the books are available from Night Shade Books ( Night Shade Books ) and apparently at least his short story collection is in stores. Some of his books are also available through Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk.

EDIT: Got a reply from the author.

Quoted from "Matt Hughes"
I know that Camelot Books lists it. They're at: 6221 Land O' Lakes Boulevard Land O' Lakes, Florida 34638 (813) 932-7162 Toll Free 1-866-634-9417 (813) 676-0406 Fax

Dave

  • Joined 11/20/00
  • 16167
  • Post #535
  • Originally posted Friday, May 16, 2008 (6 years ago)

thanks.

  • Joined 10/29/02
  • 3885
  • Post #536
  • Originally posted Friday, May 16, 2008 (6 years ago)

I'm reading through the Chronicles of Narnia. It started because we were doing a book study at church (since Prince Caspian is being released) and I couldn't read them out of order. I had tried to read them several times as a kid and just thought they were boring. I still think they're boring. But I'm in "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" which in the new order of the books is book 4. Just two more books to go and I can read something I'll enjoy!

  • Joined 4/23/01
  • 779
  • Post #537
  • Originally posted Friday, May 16, 2008 (6 years ago)

So 80s (2003): A Photographic Diary Of A Decade By Patrick McMullan Great photos from the 1980's including Ipanema on page 362.

Punk 365 (2007) By Holly George-Warren Photo book that covers the Punk Era.

www.ovguide.com www.tropicalglen.com www.free-tv-video-online.info

  • Joined 1/16/01
  • 12597
  • Post #538
  • Originally posted Friday, May 16, 2008 (6 years ago)

I started this thread? I have zero recollection of that. Weird.

Anyhoo, I've been on a reading frenzy lately. The past few months I've read Haruki Murakami's Hard Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, which was awesome. Cyberpunkish but philosophical and thoughtful. Really made me think about the mind.

Then I read Cory Doctorow's new book Little Brother, which was even better. Seriously, that book was just eye-opening and quite moving. What's great about it is that it's aimed at young adult audiences, and it's the perfect book to put in the hands of your favorite intelligent teenager. The book has a lot to say about the way we live our lives today, and it encourages those who read it to look at the world intelligently, questioningly, and to stand up for what they believe in even when authorities tell them to pipe down. It's very subversive, but it affirms all the values that should be affirmed in our society.

Best thing about it? It's available in its entirety for free under a CC license, just like all of Cory Doctorow's other books (he's a big believer in free culture). I urge everyone who likes to read good books that have something to say about society to pick up Little Brother. It's a fast easy read so it won't take up too much time or energy.

After finishing that book, I read Richard Dawkins' The God Delusion, which I thought was very insightful and had some great points about the role religion plays in society. The best thing about it is it promotes a worldview where one is proud to be a nonbeliever. He doesn't fumble all over himself trying to be respectful of other belief systems, he states what he thinks without worrying about the consequences or the possible offense he might cause, and I admire that a lot.

  • Joined 7/22/99
  • 2622
  • Post #539
  • Originally posted Friday, May 16, 2008 (6 years ago)

Just finished Junot Diaz's The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

Interesting and entertaining (and sad) look into the immigrant experience, Dominican culture and the pain of being an outcast. Also has the bonus of being based in New Jersey. Woo.

  • Joined 4/14/08
  • 41
  • Post #540
  • Originally posted Friday, May 16, 2008 (6 years ago)

was reading thomas pynchon's gravities rainbow. it got bumped at 100 pages in, because i just couldn't take it anymore. hey i like schizophrenic writing as much as the next idiosyncrat, but yeah. unreadable. maybe will try again shortly though.

it got bumped by mark danowski's house of leaves, which is perhaps THE most pretentious piece of writing i've ever read. nevertheless i loved it. i found it genuinely spooky, which is a pretty rare thing for a book. very imaginative, very multilayered, very interwoven, but also very readable. though the bit where you have to turn the book sideways or upside down to read it are a bit disconcerting. only book i've ever read that uses typesetting to dramatic effect.

just finished neil gaiman's anansi boys. sequel to american gods. a light and fluffy but thoughtful read really. atmosphere stragely reminded me a bit of chick lit, just without the chick lit. but that may just be me.

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