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My glasses are turning white!

  • Joined 9/5/03
  • 105

I've recently noticed that my plastic frames (not lenses) are beginning to turn white. Is there some way to get rid of this? Someone suggested scraping the white parts off, but that seems like it might do even more damage. I think a hair product or something might be reacting with the plastic, because it doesn't really seem like a residue. It seems like it's actually the plastic that's white. Basic cleaning does nothing to reduce it, and I'm worried about using anything too harsh that might damage the frames. Any suggestions? :dunno:

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(21 items total, 30 per page)

 
  • Joined 1/30/00
  • 6375
  • Post #1
  • Originally posted Monday, March 15, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

I hate to tell you but its just the plastic corroding, probably from your body chemistry. This was the fate of my last glasses. They were vintage frames, as are my current ones which are also turning white.

I checked with some eye frame dealers and they seem to think there was nothing you could do. If you learn other wise I would love to hear the solution!

  • Joined 9/5/03
  • 105
  • Post #2
  • Originally posted Monday, March 15, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

grr. That's frustrating. I have also retired a previous pair for the same reason. Eli still insists you can just scrape off the white stuff. I'm not so keen on that one though. Glad to know it's not just me!

  • Joined 7/25/99
  • 8826
  • Post #3
  • Originally posted Tuesday, March 16, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

Have you tried oiling them and then wiping off? Sounds like a drying out problem.

  • Joined 7/25/99
  • 8826
  • Post #4
  • Originally posted Tuesday, March 16, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

From what I can find out you might be able to fix the problem also w/that stuff they use to keep car seats supple. You know the stuff I mean in the pump bottle. People use it alot on leather and plastics.

  • Joined 1/18/03
  • 2538
  • Post #5
  • Originally posted Tuesday, March 16, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)
Quoted from "Miss Behave"
I hate to tell you but its just the plastic corroding

That's basically what this is. I don't know anything that can be used for eyeglasses directly, but most corrossion of platic occurrs dur to external elements so one way to protet the glasses i s to put a protective barrier on it. I put wax on my snowboard and wax on my car, so my first guess would also be wax. but befre you dip your gasses in candle wax, I will do my reserach as to what type of plastic it is that you are dealing with. Different materials have different cemcals you can buy to protect it wheter ist may come in a spray form, wax, or liquid polish.

Nima

  • Joined 11/20/00
  • 16167
  • Post #6
  • Originally posted Tuesday, March 16, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

Armorall that protects vinyl and plastic in car interiors would probably keep the corrosion from increasing, but I don't know if it will get rid of what already exists.

  • Joined 4/14/01
  • 2277
  • Post #7
  • Originally posted Tuesday, March 16, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

It might be your natural chemistry, or it might be the side effect of any makeup or lotions you may use.

Good luck.

  • Joined 5/11/00
  • 599
  • Post #8
  • Originally posted Tuesday, March 16, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)
Quoted from "RubyMae"
Armorall that protects vinyl and plastic in car interiors would probably keep the corrosion from increasing, but I don't know if it will get rid of what already exists.

Armorall also makes things superslick, so you would in be danger of having your glasses fall off your face all the time. Plus I don't think the chemicals in it are very safe to have on contact with your skin.

I'd recommend lacquering. Clear nail polish or any kind of varnishing that dries and is safe on skin contact.

Or maybe you should get metallic frames?

  • Joined 11/20/00
  • 16167
  • Post #9
  • Originally posted Tuesday, March 16, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

I don't remember the name of it, but there is a product that removes scratches from glass and plastic surfaces. Maybe that would help with the white.

Armorall wipes do not leave the surface slick. If you're worried about the chemicals, don't wipe the portion of the frames that sit on your ears or the nose piece.

  • Joined 5/11/00
  • 599
  • Post #10
  • Originally posted Tuesday, March 16, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

If the only part of the frames that are turning white are those contacting your skin, then for the part that wraps around your ears, what about an eyeglass frame cozy? Something like this, but without the lanyard.

  • Joined 9/23/99
  • 22695
  • Post #11
  • Originally posted Tuesday, March 16, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

This is disgusting. Could you people please talk about sex or something!?!

-Eff

  • Joined 5/11/00
  • 599
  • Post #12
  • Originally posted Tuesday, March 16, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)
Quoted from "Effervescent"
This is disgusting. Could you people please talk about sex or something!?! -Eff

You should have a made a comment about how her frames are becoming white, i.e. from all the times she keeps her glasses on while having sex. And the white stuff is .... ? And how does Eli know it's removable?

  • Joined 4/12/01
  • 4078
  • Post #13
  • Originally posted Tuesday, March 16, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

"Frame materials Eyewear frames are made out of many different composite materials and formulas, but the basic groupings are metal and plastic. In plastics, zyl is the most common although lower quality plastics are used in the cheaper frames. Nylon is often used in sport sunglasses due to its impact resistance and flexibility. Among the metals, monel is most common, followed by stainless steel, titanium, nickel silver, and aluminum.

Commonly called "zyl", cellulose acetate is made of wood flakes, cottonseed fibers, stabilizers and plasticizers. Zyl is the most common plastic frame material because it can assume a large array of colors, textures and patterns. Temples and frame fronts can be cut from blocks of zyl extruded as a sheet of block acetate. Or, granular zyl can be liquefied and then injection molded. Block-cut zyl is stronger and more stable, while injection molded zyl is less stable and less expensive. With daily use in warm temperatures, zyl can shift and lose its form. Sometimes metal cores are added in the temples in order to strengthen and stabilize the frame. If zyl eyeglass frames reach a temperature over 160 degrees Fahrenheit, the plasticizers could rise to the surface of the frame, turning areas of the frame a milky white color. In addition, body oils, perspiration, ultraviolet radiation and cosmetics can also damage the material."

There are two approaches, either you can replace the plasticizers in the material (this is what Armor All does to dashboards), or cover the white patches with clear nail polish.

I'd try Armor All first. Wipe it on, let it soak for 5-10 minutes, then wipe any excess off. If the frames are still too oily or slick, wipe them down with a paper towel soaked w/ rubbing alcohol.

  • Joined 5/22/01
  • 4649
  • Post #14
  • Originally posted Tuesday, March 16, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

Is the plastic used in eyeglass frames the same kind that plastic surgeons use in let's say Michael Jackson's surgeries ?

  • Joined 6/5/01
  • 243
  • Post #15
  • Originally posted Tuesday, March 16, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

although some of ti is corrosion, i notice sometimes my frames build up salt deposits from gettin all sweaty with them on -- uh from dancing that is :P

  • Joined 7/25/99
  • 8826
  • Post #16
  • Originally posted Tuesday, March 16, 2004 (Over 10 years ago)

:lol: Told Ya!

  • Joined 9/8/12
  • 1
  • Post #17
  • Originally posted Saturday, September 8, 2012 (2 years ago)

Hey everyone, i just signed on this to give you the solution. This really works and it is as simple as pie. MR CLEAN MAGIC ERASER will clear that hideous white residue.

I have a pair of very expensive Cutler & Gross frames which i payed about $600 dollars for so of course i was gutted to see them horrible white markings aroun the ear turns on the temples. So i tried armorall and dw40 and alot of other stuff except anything with ammonia.

I remember awhile ago a good mate of mine described the Mr Clean magic eraser as a gift from friendly extraterrestrials cause it was the only thing that would work getting scratches of our darkly stained hardwood floors so after reading these posts with no answer i remembered about them friendly ET's.

AND TRIED ONE LAST THING.... NO MORE EMBARRASSING WHITE STAINS !!!!!!!

So i can proudly say that i solve all of your problems. IT IS AMAZIN AND IT [bleep!]EN WORKS !!!!!!!

SWEET !!!!!!!

  • Joined 9/14/01
  • 3370
  • Post #18
  • Originally posted Sunday, September 9, 2012 (2 years ago)

Did you use these glasses to watch the Republican National Convention? Perhaps they were paying too much attention to it.

"A revolution without dancing is a revolution not worth having" - V

  • Joined 12/29/13
  • 1
  • Post #19
  • Originally posted Sunday, December 29, 2013 (8 months ago)

EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL!!!!!!!

I tried armor all and clear nail polish neither worked. don't use nail polish because it acts like a sealer so you're just sealing in it without solving the problem.

  • Joined 2/7/14
  • 1
  • Post #20
  • Originally posted Friday, February 7, 2014 (7 months ago)

Olive oil actually does help reduce the milky white appearance on my tortoise shell frames. I suspect I'll have to keep applying it to retain the desired affect, and that could be messy. I also noticed that only the outside of the frame turns white, not the inside surface facing my skin. That suggests to me that the breakdown of the chemistry in the frames is caused by exposure to UV rays, and not sweat or chemicals I apply to my face.

  • Joined 9/3/14
  • 1
  • Post #21
  • Originally posted Wednesday, September 3, 2014 (4 weeks ago)

Here's what works; at least it works for me: Bar Keeper's Friend. Wet some of the powder and rub it into the frames until the white disappears. It's not instantaneous, it'll take a few minutes. You are essentially rubbing off a layer of the plastic. Rinse off and dry. Repeat until you're happy.

(21 items total, 30 per page)